Kickass Canadians

Ann-Marie (right) reading from ‘Adult Onset’ at the Ottawa International Writers Festival, with CBC’s Sandra Abma, November 2014

Ann-Marie MacDonald, writer-actor-creator-feminist

“As an artist you have to have authentic self and an authentic core, which is a channel for stories and for meaning.” – Ann-Marie MacDonald

I was bewitched by Fall On Your Knees when it first came out, and have followed Ann-Marie’s career ever since. If you’ve read her work, you know what a lyrical and poetic author she is. Even more than that, she seems to possess otherworldliness; from her three novels, there’s a strong sense of haunting, of past and present irrevocably intertwined, and of a great connection to the wisdom of the spirits.

Such a rich tapestry begs to be examined, down to its barest threads. Read more…

Review: The Guardian (UK)

Adult Onset by Ann-Marie MacDonald review – an acidly funny portrait of parenthood

A writer’s stint in the psychic sweat lodge of toddler-rearing prompts a search for the secrets of her troubled childhood

It’s April on an ordinary Monday in a trendy Toronto neighbourhood and the trees are “tight with buds”. A woman, married to another woman (partner sounds “sexless” and lesbian sounds “lizardy”), walks her child and ageing dog. Mary Rose MacKinnon’s life is a densely woven fabric of domestic detail: “expiring” birthday balloons, grilled cheese, ingested toothpaste, hamsters, glass unicorns. But insistent as the faint pings of sonar, distant memories begin to intrude. Mary Rose increasingly sees double: while parenting her lively two-year-old, Maggie, she remembers herself at the same age, erratically parented by her own depressed mother. The result – in the capable hands of Ann-Marie MacDonald, Orange Prize nominee for her 1996 novel Fall on Your Knees – is a powerful psychological gyre. – Read more

Atlantic Books Today

Ann-Marie MacDonald’s latest novel revisits painful terrain to find forgiveness

“The way I’ve been thinking of [this book] is like when you haven’t gone grocery shopping, but need to make supper. There’s always pasta. My youngest was five when I started writing this book. I thought okay, I’m going to start writing fiction again, but I’m writing pasta. It’s going to be here-and-now, no sets and costumes.” – Ann-Marie MacDonald

Read more

Vancouver Sun

Sun Book Club chats with Adult Onset author Ann-Marie MacDonald

Photograph by: Arlen Redekop , Vancouver Sun

The Sun’s book club held a live chat with Ann-Marie MacDonald, author of Adult Onset, a novel about memory and modern parenting.

View chat transcript

A Not-Review: The Joy Experiment

On Motherhood and Rage: A Not-Review of Anne Marie MacDonald’s Adult Onset

The put your pillow over your face to keep it quiet as you fall asleep kind of book is a rare thing. There are only two other books in the last 5 years that have had this effect on me — Jose Saramago’s Blindness and Marilynne Robinson’s Home (I am half-way through the third book in this trilogy, Lila, and am flabbergasted at how completely and masterfully Robinson has offered completely unique points of view in each of the books and how it speaks so much to how much we never really know or understand any one else). – Read more

Calgary Herald

Ann-Marie MacDonald mines motherhood and a painful past for Adult Onset

Ann-Marie MacDonald

“It’s kind of like when you have to make supper and you haven’t gone grocery shopping and there’s no food in the house,” says MacDonald, in an interview at the Calgary Herald. “But there always is. We’re having pasta. That’s what I figured with this book. I thought ‘I have to be able to write right from my head, right from my heart. Everything has to be already in me.’ I thought that would be easy: wash-and-wear, never needs ironing.” – Read more

Fast Forward Weekly

Adult Onset trades historical grandeur for the microcosm of family life

Adult Onset will surprise fans of MacDonald’s two previous and wildly successful novels, Fall On Your Knees and The Way the Crow Flies, with a story that trades historical grandeur for the microcosm of family life. – Read more